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70 years ago, the British handed over the Volkswagen plant in Wolfsburg to the Federal Republic of Germany. The date marked the dawn of Volkswagen’s ascent in post-war Germany and beyond.

Volkswagen and its British roots ...
On August 22, 1945, the British ordered Volkswagen to produce 20,000 cars for the British military administration. Here you see the very first limousines built after the war, sitting high on a bucket car chassis
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An officer and a gentleman - Major Ivan Hirst (1916 - 2000), of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), took over responsibility as Senior Resident Officer at the factory at the beginning of August 1945.
In 1945, the responsibility for the Volkswagen plant was transferred to the British military government. It confiscated the company in accordance with Control Council Act No. 52 and held it in trust until it was handed back to the Germans.
On August 22, 1945, the British ordered 20,000 cars for the British military administration. Here you see the very first limousines built after the war, sitting high on a bucket car chassis
First production jubilee - Due to the shortage of raw materials and the severe winter conditions, it took nearly three months before the 1,000th car was produced. From March 1946 on, working conditions improved and car production figures rose steadily.
On October 8, 1949 trusteeship over "Volkswagenwerk GmbH" was handed over to the Federal Republic of Germany. The State of Lower Saxony was charged with administration. Colonel Charles Radclyffe (center) signed the protocol. The picture shows on the right the Federal Minister of Economics and the later Chancellor Dr. Ludwig Erhard.

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