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12/11/18
Wolfsburg (D)
Models

With high-tech as a standard

Back in the days, it even left some of the classier sports cars in its wake: the Corrado. Engine power, road-holding ability and design elements formed an extraordinarily dynamic package. This year, the rapid 2+2-seater from Osnabrück celebrates its 30th birthday. We show what technical refinements and visual aspects still live on in today’s Volkswagen models.

Volkswagen at the Techno Classica 2017: the best of both worlds
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Masterly design and technology: For the first time in the brand’s history, the bumpers were given the same paint job as the rest of the car and the fenders were Volkswagen’s first CAD production parts.
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For perfect handling: The rear spoiler, which could extend automatically at 120 km/h, increased downforce on the rear axle by up to 64 percent.
The 911 followed the example of the Corrado’s sophisticated rear wing.
Ingenious aerodynamics: The spirit of the Corrado rear wing can be found in the Arteon’s integrated tailgate spoiler.
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The Passat B3 provided the inspiration for the interior: Some of the clear cockpit architecture and high-quality materials were derived from the international best-seller from Emden.
Ergonomic, comfortable and sporty: The Corrado achieved a successful compromise between emotionality and suitability for everyday use.
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The chassis of the GTI Mk3 formed the basis for the socalled "Plus chassis" of the Corrado VR6.
Charismatically uncompromising: The seventh generation of the Golf R was, like the Corrado, the fastest Volkswagen at the time of its launch.
The limited edition, of which only 505 were made in 1995, was only available in Great Britain.
As the Corrado once did, the latest Polo GTI sprints from 0 to 100 km/h in under seven seconds – exactly 6.7 seconds with the dual-clutch gearbox.

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